Nauka

Biogramy uczestników konferencji "Who is Europe?"

konferencja, whi is Europe, Muzeum POLIN, CoHerekonferencja, whi is Europe, Muzeum POLIN, CoHerekonferencja, whi is Europe, Muzeum POLIN, CoHerekonferencja, whi is Europe, Muzeum POLIN, CoHerekonferencja, whi is Europe, Muzeum POLIN, CoHerekonferencja, whi is Europe, Muzeum POLIN, CoHerekonferencja, whi is Europe, Muzeum POLIN, CoHerekonferencja, whi is Europe, Muzeum POLIN, CoHere
fot. Monika Seyfried / CoHERE Critical Archive

Kliknij w nazwisko, żeby przeczytać biogram wybranego uczestnika konferencji.
 

 

 

Gabi Arrigoni is a Research Associate at Newcastle University, working on the EU-funded project CoHERE: Critical Heritages Performing and Representing Identities in Europe in which she investigates the role of digitally-enabled conversations in constructing heritage identities in Europe. She is interested in the fields of digital culture, digital heritage and future-oriented, design-based methodologies. She has a PhD in Digital Media researched at Culture Lab, focused on the notion of artistic prototypes and the practice of artists working in technology-oriented labs. Arrigoni has curated exhibitions, workshops and symposia in Italy and the UK. Her research has been published in peer-reviewed journals as well as presented at international conferences in the field of heritage studies, new media art and digital cultures. Arrigoni’s key publications include: “Epistemologies of prototyping: knowing in artistic research” in Digital Creativity, “Fiction and curatorial practice: developing alternative experiences for digital artistic prototypes” in International Journal of Performance Arts and Digital Media), “Understanding Artistic Prototypes Between Activism and Research” in Proceedings of the Third Conference on Computation, Communication, Aesthetics and X (xCoAx 2015).

Wróć na górę strony

 

Gurminder K. Bhambra is Professor of Postcolonial and Decolonial Studies in the School of Global Studies at the University of Sussex. While her research interests are primarily in the area of postcolonial and global historical sociology, she is also interested in the intersection of the social sciences more generally with recent work in postcolonial and decolonial studies. Her current project is on epistemological justice and reparations. She authored numerous books and articles and edited and co-edited special issues of journals and collections. Her first monograph, Rethinking Modernity: Postcolonialism and the Sociological Imagination (Palgrave 2007), won the 2008 Philip Abrams Memorial Prize for best first book in sociology. In her second book, Connected Sociologies (Bloomsbury 2014), which is open access and free to read, she has put forward an argument for the recognition of ‘connected histories’ in the reconstruction of historical sociology at a global level.

Wróć na górę strony

 

Ian Biddle is a cultural theorist and musicologist, working on a range of topics in music- and sound-related areas. His work ranges from the cultural history of music and masculinity, theorizing music's intervention in communities and subjectivities, sound, soundscapes and urban experience, and the politics of noise. His interests include memory studies, Holocaust Studies, sound studies, Italian workerist and autonomist theory, psychoanalysis and theoretical approaches to 'affective' states. Ian is co-founder and coordinating editor of the journal Radical Musicology and is on the editorial board of The Journal of the Royal Musical Association. He has published on music in the Austro-German tradition, music in the Holocaust and music in Yiddish-language traditions.

Wróć na górę strony

 

Adam Bodnar (PhD) is Commissioner for Human Rights in Poland. He is also an expert in the Agency of Fundamental Rights of European Union. Prior to assuming the post of Ombudsman, he was a lecturer at the Law and Administration Department of the University of Warsaw. In 2004-2015 Bodnar worked for the Helsinki Foundation of Human Rights, firstly as a co-founder and then as the vice-president of the Management Board. In 2013-2014 he was a member of the Board of Directors of the United Nations Fund for Victims of Torture. He also cooperated with various non-governmental organizations, including Panaptykon Fund (chairman of the Foundation Council) and ClientEarth Poland. In 2011 he was awarded with the Tolerance Prize by Polish LGBT organizations.

Wróć na górę strony

 

Włodzimierz Borodziej is a Professor of Contemporary History at Warsaw University. He serves as the  Chairman of Academic Committee of Imre Kertész series Polskie Dokumenty Dyplomatyczne (Polish Diplomatic Documents), published by the Polish Institute of International Affairs. Borodziej is also the Chairman of Academic Committee of the House of European History in Brussels. His recent publications include: Nasza Wojna. Tom I: Imperia, 1912-1916 (Our War. First volume: Empires, 1912-1916) (with Maciej Górny, Warsaw, 2014), Nasza Wojna. Tom II: Narody, 1917-1923 (Our war. Second volume: Nations, 1917-1923) (with Maciej Górny, Warsaw, 2018), which were both published in German in 2018. Borodziej also published 11.11.1918. Niepodległość i Pamięć o Europie Środkowej (11/11/1918. Independence and Memory: Central Europe) (with Maciej Górny and Piotr T. Kwiatkowski, Krakow, 2018) and Prasa zagraniczna o Polsce. Listopad 1918 – luty 1919  (International Press on Poland. November 1918 – February 1919) (Warsaw, 2018). 

Wróć na górę strony

 

David Clarke (PhD) is Professor of Modern German Studies at Cardiff University. He is an interdisciplinary scholar with a strong interest in memory and heritage. Alongside work on difficult heritage and soft power, his recent research focuses on the role of victims in the politics of memory. His monograph Constructions of Victimhood: Remembering the Victims of State Socialism in Germany is forthcoming with Palgrave Macmillan in 2019. Until October 2018, he was a participant in the Horizon 2020 project UNREST – Unsettling Remembering and Social Cohesion in Transnational.

Wróć na górę strony

 

Susannah Eckersley (PhD) is a lecturer in Museum, Gallery & Heritage Studies at Newcastle University, UK, with research interests in museums and difficult heritage (in particular relating to German history); memory, identity and belonging; the heritage of migration, diversity and representation; cultural policy; museum architecture and built heritage. She was a researcher on the European Commission funded €2.8m FP7 project, MeLA: European Museums in an Age of Migrations from 2011-2014, and is currently the deputy project coordinator of, and co-investigator on, CoHERE: Critical Heritages – Performing and Representing Identities in Europe, funded by European Commission Horizon 2020. Her publications include: Between appropriation and appropriateness: instrumentalising dark heritage in populism and memory? (Eckersley, S., 2019 forthcoming), European Memory in Populism: Representations of Self and Other (in Kaya, A and de Cesari, C. (eds)), Dimensions of European Heritage and Memory (Routledge: London, Whitehead, C., Eckersley, S., Daugbjerg, M. Bozoglu, G. with Mason, R., Zito, A. and Davenport, B., 2019 forthcoming), Encountering authenticity in the contact zone? Museums, refugees and participation (Routledge: London, Eckersley, S., 2018 forthcoming), Museen, Orte des Authentischen? (in Sabrow, M, Saupe, A. (eds)), 'People-Place-Process' and Attachment in the Museum: A New Paradigm for Understanding Belonging? (Schriften des RGZM, Eckersley, S., 2017) Museums, Migration and Identity in Europe (in Anthropological Journal of European Cultures 2017, 6(2), Whitehead, C., Lloyd, K., Eckersley, S., & Mason, R. (eds), 2015), Walking the tightrope between memory and diplomacy: Addressing the post-World War II Expulsions of Germans in German Museums Ashgate: London, Eckersley, S. (2015), Museums, Migration and Identity in Europe (in Whitehead, C., Lloyd, K., Eckersley, S. & Mason, R. (eds), 2015), Placing Migration in European Museums: Theoretical, Contextual and Methodological Foundations (Ashgate: London, Whitehead, C., Eckersley, S. & Mason, R. (2012), Mela Books, Politecnico di Milano: Milan.

Wróć na górę strony

 

Máiréad Nic Craith is Professor of Cultural Heritage at Heriot-Watt University, Scotland. Most recently, Craith served as a visiting scholar at Harvard University. Prior to this post, Craith served as a DAAD visiting Professor of European Ethnology at Göttingen University and held an honorary professorship at the University of Exeter. Craith also held academic positions at the Universities of Ulster, Dublin and Cork.

Wróć na górę strony

 

Areti Galani is a Senior Lecturer in Media, Culture, Heritage at Newcastle University (UK) specializing in digital heritage. She holds degrees in Museology and Computing Science and has curated projects in Greece and the UK. Dr Galani explores the potential of research through design (RtD) approaches in heritage contexts through the design, development and evaluation of digital interactive applications and installations for museums and heritage sites. In her recent research, she has looked at how empathy and memory are negotiated by visitors in museum exhibitions about migration. She is currently a Co-I in the Horizon2020 project CoHERE (2016–2019), in which she investigates how digital practices and platforms provide opportunities for dialogue about and through heritage in the context of European identity/ies. Her research is published in both Human Computer Interaction (HCI) and heritage-related edited volumes and peer-reviewed journals. She is the chief editor of the forthcoming volume European Heritage, Dialogue and Digital Practices (Routledge, 2019). Her recent publications include: Galani A., Clarke, R. (Routledge 2019, in press) ‘Configuring slow technology through social and embodied interaction: making time for reflection in augmented reality museum experiences with young visitors’, in Lewi, H., et al. (eds) International Handbook in New Digital Practices in Galleries, Libraries, Archives Museums and Heritage Sites; Mason, R., Galani, A., Lloyd, K., Sayner, J. 'Experiencing Mixed Emotions in the Museum: Empathy and Memory in Visitors’ Responses to Histories of Migration', in: Smith, L.J., Wetherell, M., Campbell, G. (eds) Emotion, Affective Practices and the Past in the Present (London and New York: Routledge 2018); Galani, A., Mazel, A., Maxwell, D., Sharpe, K. ‘Situating Cultural Technologies Outdoors: Empathy in the Design of Mobile Interpretation of Rock Art in Rural Britain’, in: Ch'ng, E., Gaffney, V., Chapman, H. (eds) Visual Heritage in the Digital Age (London: Springer 2013).

Wróć na górę strony

 

Lia Galani is Assistant Professor in the Department of Primary Education at the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece. In this role, Galani teaches human and physical geography in education as well as the educational use of IT in school geography. She led a digital story-creating program for Greek television under the title Write the History. Galani cooperates with the Laskaridis Foundation and the Foundation of Hellenic World in non-formal educational projects concerning science and cultural geography. She has collaborated with Genadios Library, the Archaeological Society at Athens, and recently with Acropolis Museum on the design of educational activities and software for devices in order to support museum and libraries visits.

Wróć na górę strony

 

Jolanta Gumula is the POLIN Museum’s Deputy Director for Programming. Graduate of Art History Department at Jagiellonian University. She has worked in the field of museum administration and management for more than 14 years. Gumula worked at the National Museum in Kraków for 8 years, serving as Head of the Education Department. Later on, she established the Museum Education Center at the Łazienki Park in Warsaw, first serving as Head and then as Deputy Director for Museum Administration and Management. She is a co-founder of the Educators Forum and a member of the group of coordinators responsible for the implementation of the research project concerning the state of museum education in Poland, which is under the auspices of the Ministry of Culture and National Heritage. Gumula also completed internships at the Museum of London and the Victoria and Albert Museum in London and was a curator for the permanent exhibition at the Pan Tadeusz Museum in Wroclaw. Gumula is the author of art studies handbooks for junior high schools.

Wróć na górę strony

 

Cornelius Holtorf is Professor of Archaeology and UNESCO Chair on Heritage Futures at Linnaeus University, Campus Kalmar, Sweden. Holtorf also directs Linnaeus University’s Graduate School in Contract Archaeology (GRASCA). His research interests include the theory of heritage, the archaeology of the future, and applied archaeology. Holtorf’s recent books include Cultural Heritage, Ethics and Contemporary Migrations (co-edited with G. Scarre and A. Pantazatos, Routledge 2018), The Archaeology of Time Travel. Experiencing the Past in the 21st Century (co-edited with B. Petersson, Archaeopress, 2017, available in open access), and Cultural Heritage and the Future (co-edited with A. Högberg, forthcoming with Routledge, 2019). More details about his entire work can be found at http://web.comhem.se/cornelius.

Wróć na górę strony

 

Constanze Itzel is Museum Director at the House of European History in Brussels. She worked on the House of European History project as an adviser and curator since its inception in 2009, and was appointed head of the Museum in June 2017. Previously, Constanze had worked as a researcher at the University of Heidelberg, and a curator at the Badisches Landesmuseum Karlsruhe and did freelance work and internships at five other museums in Germany and France. She then worked several years for the Committee on Culture and Education of the European Parliament. Constanze holds a PhD degree for her thesis dedicated to the impact of the image debate on fifteenth-century paintings. She has written about the pre-reformatory image debate and about different facets of daily life in the Middle Ages. In the context of her work for the European Parliament's Committee on Culture and Education, Constanze has produced papers on the European Union's culture and education policies and on their history. For the House of European History, she has researched content and materials about the history of the European Union, Europeanisation, the myth of Europa, the history of migrations, post-war European history, and the history of encounters, contact, and languages.

Wróć na górę strony

 

Ayhan Kaya is Professor of Politics and Jean Monnet Chair of European Politics of Interculturalism in the Department of International Relations at Istanbul Bilgi University. Kaya is also the Director of the European Institute and the Jean Monnet Centre of Excellence and a member of the Science Academy in Turkey. He received his PhD and MA degrees at the University of Warwick, England. Kaya was previously a Jean Monnet Fellow at the European University Institute, Robert Schuman Centre for Advanced Studies, Florence, Italy, and an adjunct lecturer at New York University in Florence from 2016-2017. He previously worked and taught at the European University Viadrina as Aziz Nesin Chair in 2013, and at Malmö University, Sweden, as the Willy Brandt Chair in 2011. Kaya is currently working on a manuscript about populism and heritage in Europe. His books include Turkish Origin Migrants and their Descendants: Hyphenated Identities in Transnational Space (Palgrave 2018), Europeanization and Tolerance in Turkey (Palgrave 2013), Islam, Migration and Integration: The Age of Securitization (Palgrave 2012), Contemporary Migrations in Turkey: Integration or Return (Istanbul Bilgi University Press, in Turkish, co-edited with Murat Erdoğan, 2015), Belgian-Turks, Brussels: King Baudouin Foundation (co-written with Ferhat Kentel, 2008), Euro-Turks: A Bridge or a Breach between Turkey and the EU (Brussels: CEPS Publications, co-written with Ferhat Kentel, Turkish version by Bilgi University, 2005). Kaya also wrote another book titled Sicher in Kreuzberg: Constructing Diasporas, published in two languages, English (Bielefeld: Transkript verlag, 2001) and Turkish (Istanbul: Büke Yayınları, 2000). He also translated Ethnic Groups and Boundaries by Fredrik Barth and Citizenship and Social Classes by T. H. Marshall and Tom Bottomore into Turkish.

Wróć na górę strony

 

Marta Karkowska is a sociologist and historian who serves as an Assistant Professor in the Institute of Philosophy and Sociology at the Polish Academy of Sciences (IFiS PAN). Her interests revolve around the themes of collective memory and locality as well as issues relating to the archiving of qualitative data. In her research she examines the changes of cultural memory as well as the theoretical side of research on memory in its social dimension.    

Wróć na górę strony

 

Simon McKerrell (PhD) is interested in the social impact of music and how it relates to policy. He is the author of Focus: Scottish Traditional Music (Routledge), and the co-editor of Music as Multimodal Discourse: Media, Power and Protest (Bloomsbury) and Understanding Scotland Musically: Folk, Tradition, Policy (Routledge). McKerrell is a senior lecturer in music at the International Center for Music Studies at Newcastle University and has previously held positions at the Universities of Sheffield, Glasgow and the Royal Conservatoire of Scotland. Prior to this, he worked at the National Piping Centre in Glasgow. McKerrell is an expert performer of Highland-, Border- and Uilleann-pipes and has toured, taught, and performed throughout the world and recorded twelve commercial albums. His recent publications include: McKerrell S, West G, (eds.) Understanding Scotland Musically: Folk, Tradition, Policy (Abingdon, Oxon., Routledge, 2018), Way L, McKerrell S, (eds.) Music as Multimodal Discourse: Media, Power and Protest (London & New York: Bloomsbury, 2017), http://www.bloomsbury.com/uk/music-as-multimodal-discourse-9781474264426/, McKerrell, S. Focus on Scottish Traditional Music, (New York & London: Routledge, 2016), https://www.routledge.com/products/9780415741934.

Wróć na górę strony

 

Ullrich Kockel is Professor of Cultural Ecology and Sustainability at Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh. With degrees in business from Hochschule Bremen, where he worked as a Research Assistant in Energy Economics, and finance and accounting from Leeds Polytechnic, where he later taught German Studies, he won a doctoral scholarship in Social and Environmental Studies from the University of Liverpool, for a study of regional development in Ireland. In 1988, he was appointed to the new Institute of Irish Studies at Liverpool, and as the Visiting Lecturer in Geography to the University College Cork. Throughout the 1990s, he and his team worked closely with the European Center for Traditional and Regional Cultures. In 2000, he took up a professorship in European Studies at the University of the West of England in Bristol, and in 2003 he was elected to the Academy of the Social Sciences. The University of Ulster in 2005 offered him a professorship in Ethnology and Folklife at its Academy of Irish Cultural Heritages, and the following year he was invited as editor-in-chief of the Anthropological Journal of European Cultures. He served two terms as President of SIEF, the International Society for Ethnology and Folklore (2008-2013). Kockel was appointed as the Visiting Professor of Social Anthropology at Vytautas Magnus University Kaunas in Lithuania, in 2011, and was elected to the Royal Irish Academy in 2012. In the same year, he joined Heriot-Watt. Kockel’s wide-ranging research includes endogenous development, heritage and traditions, human ecology, and cultural encounters. Among his most important publications are Borderline Cases: The Ethnic Frontiers of European Integration (1999), Revisioning Europe (2010), and A Companion to Heritage Studies (with William Logan and Máiréad Nic Craith, 2015).

Wróć na górę strony

 

Erica Lehrer is a socio-cultural anthropologist and curator. She is currently Associate Professor in the departments of History and Sociology‑Anthropology, and Canada Research Chair in Museum & Heritage Studies at Concordia University, Montreal. She also is Founding Director of the Centre for Ethnographic Research & Exhibition in the aftermath of Violence (http://cerev.concordia.ca/). She is the author (among other publications) of Jewish Poland Revisited: Heritage Tourism in Unquiet Places (Indiana University Press 2013), editor (with Michael Meng) of Jewish Space in Contemporary Poland (2015), and in 2013 curated the exhibit Souvenir, Talisman, Toy at the Seweryn Udziela Ethnographic Museum in Krakow, and in 2014 published the accompanying book Lucky Jews (Ha!art 2014) and the online exhibit www.luckyjews.com. She is currently working with a Polish research team (Roma Sendyka, Wojciech Wilczyk, Magdalena Zych) on the Horizon 2020 project "Awkward Objects of Genocide: Vernacular Art on the Holocaust and Ethnographic Museums.

Wróć na górę strony

 

Paweł Machcewicz is a  historian and political scientist. He is professor of history at the Institute of Political Studies, the Polish Academy of Sciences. In the years 2008-2017 he served as a founding director of the  Museum of the Second World War in Gdańsk. In April 2017, immediately after the Museum had opened its door to the public, he was dismissed from his position by the Law and Justice government. Machcewicz taught at the University of Warsaw and the Nicolaus Copernicus University in Toruń; he was also co-founder of the Institute of National Remembrance whose research and education departments he headed in the years 2000-2006. His many books include Rebellious Satellite: Poland 1956 (2009) and  Poland`s War on Radio Free Europe, 1950-1989 (2014) in the Cold War Series of the Woodrow Wilson Center Press and Stanford University Press. He was also editor  and co-author of the two-volume series Wokół Jedwabnego (2002; the German edition: Der Beginn der Vernichtung. Zum Mord an den Juden in Jedwabne und Umgebung in Sommer 1941. Neue Forschungsergebnisse polnischer Historiker, Fibre, Osnabrück 2004). His most recent book titled Muzeum (ZNAK, Kraków 2017) describes the history of creating the Museum of the Second World in Gdańsk and the controversies it stirred (its German edition was  published in May 2018 by the Harrassowitz Verlag under the title Der umkämpfte Krieg. Das Museum des Zweiten Weltkriegs in Danizg. Enstehung und Streit). Currently Machcewicz is a fellow at the Imre Kertesz Kolleg at the Jena University (October 2018 - September 2019). He is also working on a comparative book on retributive justice from the end of the Second World War until the aftermath of the collapse of Communist regimes in Eastern Europe.

Wróć na górę strony

 

Rhiannon Mason is Professor of Heritage and Cultural Studies and the Head of the School of Arts and Cultures at Newcastle University, UK. In her research she is primarily interested in identities and heritage. Her work focuses on: how collective and personal memories and identities are interwoven within the physical and symbolic space of the museum; museum displays about the histories and memories of a place (whether regional, national, international or post-national); the role of heritage and memory institutions, practices and discourses in mediating public understandings of people’s histories, cultures and identities. Her publications include: Mason R, Sayner J. Bringing museal silence into focus: eight ways of thinking about silence in museums, International Journal of Heritage Studies (2018, Epub ahead of print); Mason R.National Museums, Globalization, and Post-nationalism: Imagining a Cosmopolitan Museology,’ Museum Worlds: Advances in Research 2013, 1(1); Mason R. Museums, Nations, Identities: Wales and its National Museums (Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 2007). Mason has participated in numerous research projects including: European Union. Horizon 2020 Award. ‘CoHERE’ (Co-Investigator, 2016-2019); European Union. ERASMUS+ ‘Active Ageing and Heritage in Adult Learning.’ (Newcastle Principal-Investigator, 2014-2017); European Union. FP7 Award. ‘MeLa: European Museums in an Age of Migrations.’ (Co-Investigator, 2011-2015); AHRC ‘Art on Tyneside: Redeveloping a permanent display about art, place and identity at the Laing Art Gallery’ (Principal-Investigator, 2008-2011).

Wróć na górę strony

 

Evangelia Mavrikaki holds a PhD in biology and is an Associate Professor and member of the Laboratory of Science Teaching & Epistemology and Educational Technology of the Faculty of Primary Education at the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece. Among her research interests are biology teaching, health, and environmental education. She has authored or co-authored many articles and chapters in Greek and international journals and books and is the author and co-author of 15 books including the Greek Gymnasium biology textbooks. She has served for four years as an elected member of the executive board – in charge for Educational Issues – of the Pan-Hellenic Association of Bio Scientists.

Wróć na górę strony

 

Rūta Muktupāvela holds a PhD in Theory of Culture. Muktupāvela is Rector of the Latvian Academy of Culture, a member of the Latvian Council of Science head of the Latvian National Council of Culture, Chairman of the Latvian Rectors’ Council head of the Association of Art Universities of Latvia, a representative of Latvia in the UNESCO Intergovernmental Committee for the Protection and Promotion of the Diversity of Cultural Expressions, and Professor of the Latvian Academy of Culture. She authored more than 50 research publications in Latvia and abroad in the field of theory of culture, ethnology, and folkloristics. She is a researcher for the European Commission Horizon 2020 project CoHERE: Critical Heritages – Performing and Representing Identities in Europe (2016-2019) and serves as the head of the national research program Sustainability of Latvian Cultural Traditions in an Innovative Environment. Habitus (2014-2018). Muktupāvela is also the editorial board member of the proceedings Studies in Folklore and Ethnology: Traditions, Practices and Identities (Lexington Books) and the editorial board member of the periodical scientific journal Philosophy/Sociology (Lithuanian Academy of Sciences). She is a member of the International Sociological Association (ISA), the European Association of Social Anthropologists
(EASA), and the Société Internationale d’Ethnologie et de Folklore (SIEF). She is a soloist in musical projects and performances based on Baltic traditional music and has performed in ensemble with folkgroup “Iļģi” and Valdis Muktupāvels in Latvia, USA, India, Norway, China, Japan, Belarus, Lithuania, Estonia, Sweden, Finland, and Belgium.

Wróć na górę strony

 

Valdis Muktupāvels is a scholar, composer, and musician. He  received his Doctor of Arts (PhD) degree in 1999 with the dissertation “Systematics of Latvian Musical Instruments.” He is Professor of Ethnomusicology and Director of the Baltic Sea Region studies MA program at the University of Latvia, a corresponding member of the Latvian Academy of Sciences. He has been guest professor in many European and North American universities. Muktupāvels is a researcher for the Horizon 2020 research project CoHERE: Critical Heritages – Performing and Representing Identities in Europe (2016-2019) and the national research program Sustainability of Latvian Cultural Traditions in an Innovative Environment. Habitus (2014-2018). His field of expertise is Latvian and Baltic traditional and modern music culture: historical and social aspects, traditions and change, musical instruments, and culture and identity issues. He has authored and co-authored six books and more than 50 scientific articles. These works are published  in such editions as The Grove Dictionary of Musical Instruments, Journal of Baltic Studies, The World of Music, The Garland Encyclopedia of World Music, Macmillan Encyclopedia of Religion, and others. Muktupāvels is also a composer of choral, instrumental, and film music, and he is renowned for his mysteries Viena pati Jāņu zāle (2010) and Nemus sonorum. Skaņumeža mistērija (2008), oratorio Pontifex. Pārcēlājs (2004), albums of traditional and modern psaltery kokles (2002), and bagpipe music (2000 in Latvia, 2002 in U.K.). Films featuring his music include Litauen – grünes Herz Europas (NDR 2008), Dina (J. Podnieka Studija, 2005), and Lettland: Wildnis zwischen Russland und Riga (NDR 2003). He is President of the Board of Latvian Authors’ Association. Muktupāvels has received the Latvian Academy of Sciences award “Top Achievement in Latvian Science in 2017” for the monograph Tautas mūzikas instrumenti Latvijā. He has also been awarded the fifth class Order of Lithuanian Grand Duke Gediminas (2001) and received the annual National Grand Prize in folklore in 2003 and 2005.

Wróć na górę strony

 

Troels Myrup Kristensen is Associate Professor of Classical Art and Archaeology for the Department of Culture and Society at Aarhus University, Denmark. Kristensen also serves as the Research Program Director. Kristensen received training in Aarhus, Leicester, Cambridge, Winnipeg, Athens and Rome and has recently finished a five-year collaborative research project The Emergence of Sacred Travel (EST): Experience, Economy, and Connectivity in Ancient Mediterranean Pilgrimage, funded by the Danish Council for Independent Research’s Sapere Aude Research Excellence Program. Since 2016, he has been Work Package Leader in the Horizon2020-funded project CoHERE: Performing and Representing European Identities, working on the role of classical antiquity in the construction of European and national identities. His research interests include the study of visual culture in the ancient world, the material culture of ancient pilgrimage, late antique art and archaeology as well as the contemporary "consumption" of heritage. He authored Making and Breaking the Gods. Christian Responses to Pagan Sculpture in Late Antiquity (2013) and Classical Heritage and European Identities: The Imagined Geographies of Danish Classicism (co-authored with Lærke Maria Andersen Funder and Vinnie Nørskov, to be published 2019). His current projects include a monograph on the archaeology of ancient Mediterranean pilgrimage that takes inspiration from the so-called "New Mobilities Paradigm," anthologies on Going, Gathering and Giving: Economies of Sacred Travel in the Ancient World (co-edited with Anna Collar, to be published with Brill's Religions in the Greco-Roman World series), and Sacred Treasures. Collecting and Inscribing Art in Ancient Sanctuaries (co-edited with Jane Fejfer, to be published with Routledge's Image, Text and Culture in Classical Antiquity series).

Wróć na górę strony

 

Cristina Petrescu is Associate Professor of Modern European History in the Faculty of Political Science at the University of Bucharest. She received her PhD in 2004 from Central European University in Budapest and authored From Robin Hood to Don Quixote: Resistance and Dissent in Communist Romania (Editura Enciclopedică 2013). She published over 30 studies on communism and the memory of this recent past in East-Central Europe in international volumes and peer-reviewed journals in the United States, Great Britain, Spain, Germany, Poland and Hungary. Her publications from the previous year include: Nostalgia, Identity and Self-Irony in Remembering Communism (with  Lavinia Stan and Lucian Turcescu), Justice, Memory and Redress in Romania: New Insights (Cambridge Scholars Publishing 2017), Dissidenten im Kommunistischen Rumänien: Kritik, Handlungsstrategien und Selbsgestellte Aufgaben, 1977-1989 (with Dragoș Petrescu, Wolfgand Eichwede and Jan Pauer), Ringen um Autonomie: Dissidentendiskurse in Mittel- und Osteuropa (Lit Verlag 2017), Archive and Memory: Herta Müller’s Entanglements with the Communist Power (with Pia Janke and Teresa Kovacs), Schreiben als Wiederstand: Elfriede Jelinek & Herta Müller (Praesens Verlag 2017), Entangled Stories: On the Meaning of Collaboration with the Securitate (with Péter Apor, Sándor Horváth and James Mark), and Secret Agents and the Memory of Everyday Collaboration in Communist Eastern Europe (Anthem Press 2017). She is currently the National Task Manager for the Horizon 2020 project COURAGE – Cultural Opposition: Understanding the Cultural Heritage of Dissent in the Former Socialist Countries (2016-2019).

Wróć na górę strony

 

Kerstin Pfeiffer is Assistant Professor of German and Intercultural Studies at Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh. Her research interests include the afterlife of medieval dramatic forms in contemporary dramatic activity and the role of performance in shaping, maintaining, and challenging notions of identity and community in areas of conflict. Dr. Pfeiffer is a member of the Intercultural Research Center at Heriot-Watt University.

Wróć na górę strony

 

Renata Piątkowska (PhD) is an art historian and graduate of the Institute of Art History at the University of Warsaw. From 1999, she has worked at Polin Museum of the History of Polish Jews and currently  serves as the Chief Curator of the Museum’s collection. Piątkowska has focused on art and culture of Polish Jews for many years. Among her numerous publications are Między «Ziemiańską» a Montparnassem. Roman Kramsztyk (Between Ziemiańska Café and Montparnas. Roman Kramsztyk, 2004). Before joining Polin, Piątkowska worked at the Jewish Historical Institute in Warsaw, where she curated the exhibitions: The work and life of Maurycy Trębacz 1861-1941 (1993); Roman Kramsztyk (1885-1942) (1997), and Our Elders Brothers: Paintings, Graphic Art and Drawings from the collection of the Jewish Historical Institute (2001) among others.

Wróć na górę strony

 

Ilaria Porciani (Prof.) teaches Modern and Contemporary History at the University of Bologna. She has published extensively on cultural, intellectual and gender history, the history of the historiography, nationalism, museums, public history, and most recently on food as heritage. Porciani directed the Bologna unit of the FW7 Project EuNaMus and is currently directing WP6 on Food as Heritage of the EU’s Horizon 2020 project CoHERE. Her scholarship on museums in the English language include: Nations on Display (with J.Tollebeek), Setting the Standards (Palgrave 2012), National Museums and the Making of Citizens and Communities (in Aronsson, P. and G. Elgenius (eds)), National Museums and Nation-building in Europe 1750 – 2010 (Routledge 2012), What can Public History do for Museums? What can Museums do for Public History? (in Memoria e Ricerca 2017), History Museums (in B. Bevernage, N. Wouters (eds)), and The Palgrave Handbook of State-Sponsored History after 1945 (Basingstoke, Palgrave 2018).    

Wróć na górę strony

 

Rafał Rogulski studied cultural and political sciences at the Universities of Wrocław and Marburg, and participated in the Executive MBA Program at the Polish Academy of Sciences in Warsaw. He was an assistant and later advisor to Professor Władysław Bartoszewski, first at the Robert Schuman Foundation and the Polish Ministry of Foreign Affairs (1998–2001), and next at the Chancellery of the Prime Minister of Poland (2008–12). From 2001 to 2005 he was secretary at the Culture Department of the Polish Embassy in Berlin. In the late 1990s Rogulski worked as a journalist for the daily Życie (Life) and the bimonthly journal Europa. In 2010, Ministers Tomasz Merta and Andrzej Przewoźnik entrusted him with the creation and management of the ENRS Secretariat, which in 2015 became the Institute of European Network Remembrance and Solidarity.

Wróć na górę strony

 

Lora Sariaslan is an art historian and curator. She is a PhD candidate at the University of Amsterdam with her dissertation “What ‘moves’ artists? The Making of Identity in the Transnational Art Practices of Contemporary European-Turkish Artists.” Sariaslan is focusing her academic research on contemporary visual artists who originally come to Europe from the other side of the European border, from Turkey. She looks into how borders form and shape the artists and hence their art, and in turn how the artists shape and inform the (b)orders. Her recent publications include “Seeing and Sewing Maps: The Art of Servet Koçyiğit” in Künstlerische Re-Orientierungen: Kontexte zeitgenössischer Kunst in der Türkei und unterwegs (Eds. Burcu Dogramaci and Marta Smolińska. Kulturverlag Kadmos, Berlin, Germany, 2017) and “’They are all Turks, but very very nice’: Re-placing contemporary artists of Turkish origin,” in the European Journal of Futures Research (2016). She received her B.A. in Art History and Integrated International Studies from Knox College, Illinois, and her M.A. in Art History from the University of Texas at Austin. She has worked at the Dallas Museum of Art in Texas (2001-2005) and was a curator at Istanbul Modern (2005-2011). Sariaslan has curated exhibitions internationally. She was the co-curator of the 2nd Mardin Biennial: Double Take in Turkey (2012) and more recently This yearning is ours! at the Center of Contemporary Art Znaki Czasu in Torun, Poland (2016). A member of AICA Turkey, Sariaslan serves as the National Correspondent for the European Museum Forum (EMF) for Turkey.

Wróć na górę strony

 

Roma Sendyka is Associate Professor at the Center for Anthropology of Literature and Culture Studies at the Jagiellonian University in Kraków, Poland. She is the head of the Research Center for Memory Cultures and the Founder of the Curatorial Collective in Krakow. She authored Nowoczesny  esej (The Modern Essay] (2006), Od kultury ja do kultury siebie [From the Culture of the I  to the Culture of the Self] (2015),  co-edited four collected volumes on memory studies: Od pamięci biodziedzicznej do postpamięci (From Bio-hereditary Memory to Postmemory] (2013), Pamięć i afekty (Memory and Affects] (2014), Afektywne historie i polityki pamięci (Affective Histories and the Politics of Memory] (2015), and Migracyjna pamięć, wspólnota, tożsamość (Migratory Memory, Community and Identity] (2016). She prepares a book Non-sites and Their Non-memory. Sendyka is the leader of a research group for the grant “ Uncommemorated Genocide Sites And Their Influence on Contemporary Formation of Collective Memory And Cultural Identity in Poland” (National Endowment for Humanities, Poland, 2016-2019] and the head of research on “Awkward Objects of Genocide. Vernacular Art on the Holocaust and Ethnographic Museums” (Transmitting Contentious Heritage with the Arts. From Intervention to Co-production, Horizon 2020). She is the editor of a book series Nowa Humanistyka (New Humanities Series, Polish Academy of Science). In addition, Sendyka was a visiting professor at the University of Chicago in 2011 through the Christian A. Johnson Endeavor Grant and a recipient of the 2011 Kosciuszko Foundation Grant. She received an award at the Patterns Program (Erste Stiftung, Vienna, 2010) for the project “(In)visible Loss. The Holocaust and the Everyday Visual Experience in Contemporary Poland and Central Europe.” Furthermore, she was a 2013 EHRI Research Fellow at NIOD in Amsterdam. Her work combines elements from three major disciplines: Polish studies, cultural studies, and visual studies.

Wróć na górę strony

 

Monika Seyfried is a Researcher at the Copenhagen Institute of Interaction Design with a background in art, photography, and filmmaking. In her work, Seyfried engages at the intersection of emerging technologies, audiovisual media and the natural environment, creating sensory rich, interactive spaces. Seyfried’s passion is to build immersive experiences, mixed reality worlds that blend the digital and physical, working with a speculative mindset and experimenting with design approaches. Her current research topics are The Future of Nuclear Fusion Energy, Ethics in Creating IoT, Critical Heritages in Europe and Plant-based Data Storage. Her work has been exhibited in several cities across the globe, including Beijing, Paris, Copenhagen, Linz and Zagreb. She teaches Interactive Spaces and Design Thinking. Seyfried is a graduate of the Copenhagen Institute of Interaction Design and the Academy of Fine Arts in Warsaw. She holds a M.A. in Audiovisual Media and Interaction Design.

Wróć na górę strony

 

Ayşe Tecmen is a researcher for the EU-funded Horizon 2020 project CoHERE: Critical Heritages  – Performing and Representing Identities in Europe at Istanbul Bilgi University’s European Institute. Tecmen has a PhD in Politics from the University of Bristol. She graduated from Emory University in the USA with a BA degree in Political Science and received her MA degree in European Studies with high honors from Istanbul Bilgi University. Her fields of interest include public diplomacy, nation branding, commercial nationalism, culture, tourism, and European identity.

Wróć na górę strony

 

Joanna Wawrzyniak (PhD) is a Part-Time Professor of History of 20th-century Central and Eastern Europe History at the European University Institute, Florence, and a researcher at the University of Warsaw’s Institute of Sociology. She has published extensively on collective and individual memory and social history in Poland within a comparative context. She recently co-authored Enemy on Display (2015, paperback edition 2017), co-edited Memory and Change in Europe (2016, paperback edition 2018), and authored the monograph Veterans, Victims, and Memory (2015). She has been a visiting fellow at a number of international institutions, including the New School for Social Research, Freiburg Institute for Advanced Studies, Imre Kertész Kolleg Jena, and the Herder Institute in Marburg. She also founded and served as the first head of the Social Memory Laboratory at the University of Warsaw from 2010 through 2018. Wawrzyniak is a co-coordinator of the Genealogies of Memory in Central and Eastern Europe project of the European Network Remembrance and Solidarity, and currently leads the City Museums and Multiple Colonial Pasts Work Package within the framework of the H2020 ECHOES project (2018-2021).

Wróć na górę strony

 

Christopher Whitehead is Professor of Museology at the Universities of Newcastle (UK) and Oslo (Norway). His current research activities today circulate around cultural politics of memory, display, knowledge construction and interpretation. He is currently working on political uses of the past, time and place, and contested histories and heritages, especially where these relate to contemporary social tensions, division and conflict. He has conducted extensive EU-funded research into museums and migration and European heritage and identity, and is coordinator of the Horizon 2020 project CoHERE: Critical Heritages of Europe. He also leads the AHRC/TUBITAK Newton Fund project Plural Heritages of Istanbul, which explores community engagement with heritage, walking ethnography, world heritage politics and co-production. He is an active participant in debates and initiatives connected to European Heritage Policy, the International Council of Museums, and UNESCO. Alongside these activities, he maintains research interests in the general areas covered in his monographs on the 19th Century Art Museum (Ashgate 2005), Museums and the Construction of Disciplines (Bloomsbury 2009), and Interpreting Art in Museums and Galleries (Routledge 2012). His most recent book is the edited volume Museums, Migration and Identity in Europe (Ashgate 2015). Whitehead is currently writing two new monographs on Analyzing Museum Display and Dimensions of European Heritage and Memory, both with Routledge.

Wróć na górę strony

 

Zofia Wóycicka (PhD) is a researcher at the Center for Historical Research in Berlin of the Polish Academy of Sciences. She studied history and sociology at the University of Warsaw and the Friedrich-Schiller University Jena and completed her PhD at the School for Social Science at the Polish Academy of Sciences and the University of Warsaw. Wóycicka worked with the Educational Center at Polin Museum of the History of Polish Jews from 2007 through 2011 and served as the exhibition curator at the House of European History in Brussels from 2011 to 2015. Her research interest lies in memory and museum studies with a special focus on World War II. Wóycicka is the author of Arrested Mourning. Memory of the Nazi Camps in Poland, 1944-1950 (Peter-Lang 2013).

Wróć na górę strony

16.11.2018